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Catecholamines
Gordon Research Conference

Contemporary Developments in Catecholamine Neurobiology and Function

Dates

August 13-18, 2017

Location

Grand Summit Hotel at Sunday River
Newry, ME Site Information

Organizers

Chair:
David Weinshenker

Vice Chair:
Patricia H. Janak

Application Deadline

Applications for this meeting must be submitted by July 16, 2017. Please apply early, as some meetings become oversubscribed (full) before this deadline. If the meeting is oversubscribed, it will be stated here. Note: Applications for oversubscribed meetings will only be considered by the Conference Chair if more seats become available due to cancellations.

Meeting Description

The 2017 GRC on Catecholamines will focus on cutting-edge developments in catecholamine research from a broad range of approaches from molecular biology to cellular physiology to behavior and clinical studies. One of the characteristics of the field is that neuronal systems using catecholamines have much in common, although investigators who focus on particular catecholamines or on different actions of the same catecholamine are often unaware of complementary aspects of catecholamine research. It is increasingly apparent that continued progress will require increasingly integrated approaches in studies of catecholamine biology, function and dysfunction. Thus, molecular biologists are being drawn to more integrated systems approaches and behavioral biologists are exploiting many molecular approaches. In particular, the development of cell-type-specific targeting approaches in recent years has permitted much more detailed and specific approaches to understanding catecholamine function. The past years have also witnessed a tremendous advance in our understanding of neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including drug abuse, affective disorders, and diseases associated with catecholamine neuron degeneration such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Sophisticated behavioral measures combined with elegant molecular, cellular and systems approaches, along with powerful imaging studies in humans, have produced a large number of high-profile reports that are likely to have a positive impact on health issues. We plan to highlight these new advances to provide a unique opportunity to discuss recent progress in the understanding of how catecholamine systems may contribute to the pathophysiology and treatment of those conditions. To achieve these goals, the 2017 conference will include researchers at the forefront of catecholamine-related research, both junior and senior, presenting primarily new, unpublished research encompassing basic mechanisms of catecholamine neurotransmission, integrated approaches to understand physiology and behavior, and studies of neurological and psychiatric pathology and treatment.

Related Meeting

This GRC will be held in conjunction with the "Catecholamines" Gordon Research Seminar (GRS). Those interested in attending both meetings must submit an application for the GRS in addition to an application for the GRC. Refer to the associated GRS program page for more information.

Contributors

Meeting Program

Sunday
2:00 pm - 9:00 pmArrival and Check-in
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 7:40 pmWelcome / Introductory Comments by GRC Site Staff
7:40 pm - 9:30 pmKeynote Session: Dopamine-Glutamate Interactions Underlying Reward System Plasticity and Addiction
Discussion Leader: Patricia Janak (Johns Hopkins University, USA)
7:40 pm - 7:55 pmOpening Remarks
7:55 pm - 8:10 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
8:10 pm - 9:10 pmMarina Wolf (Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, USA)
"Synaptic Mechanisms Maintaining Persistent Cocaine Craving"
9:10 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Monday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmSubstance Abuse
Discussion Leader: Wendy Lynch (University of Virginia, USA)
9:00 am - 9:20 amVeronica Alvarez (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, USA)
"Two Distinct Mechanisms for Evoking Dopamine Release in the Striatum and the Opposite Effect of Addictive Drugs"
9:20 am - 9:30 amDiscussion
9:30 am - 9:50 amSusan Andersen (Harvard Medical School, USA)
"Developmental Changes in the Dopamine System and Their Role in Sex-Dependent Vulnerability to Cocaine Self-Administration"
9:50 am - 10:00 amDiscussion
10:00 am - 10:20 amJohn Mantsch (Marquette University, USA)
"Neurobiological Mechanisms that Contribute to Stress-Related Cocaine Use"
10:20 am - 10:30 amDiscussion
10:30 am - 11:00 amCoffee Break
11:00 am - 11:20 amMichael Nader (Wake Forest School of Medicine, USA)
"Individual Differences in Substance Abuse: Role of Dopamine, Sex and Social Rank in Nonhuman Primate Models of Cocaine Abuse"
11:20 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:50 amPaul Vezina (The University of Chicago, USA)
"Uncertainty and the Pursuit of Amphetamine"
11:50 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmPaul Phillips (University of Washington, USA)
"Diametric Changes in Phasic Dopamine Release with Chronic Substance Use in the Control of Drug Taking and Drug Seeking"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
3:00 pm - 4:00 pmPower Hour
The GRC Power Hour is an optional informal gathering open to all meeting participants. It is designed to help address the challenges women face in science and support the professional growth of women in our communities by providing an open forum for discussion and mentoring.
Organizer: Patricia Janak (Johns Hopkins University, USA)
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmNeurophysiology and Neurotransmission
Discussion Leader: Jeremy Day (University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pmMark Thomas (University of Minnesota, USA)
"Synaptic Plasticity Correlates of Cocaine Relapse"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pmDiscussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pmCarlos Paladini (University of Texas at San Antonio, USA)
"VTA Astrocytes Regulate Learned Aversion"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pmDiscussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pmAmy Newman (National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, USA)
"A Novel and Highly Selective Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonist that May Prevent Opioid Dependence"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pmDanny Winder (Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, USA)
"Multisite Regulation of Extended Amygdala Function by Alpha-2a Adrenergic Receptors"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Tuesday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmCircuits and Molecules
Discussion Leader: Garret Stuber (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA)
9:00 am - 9:25 amNaoshige Uchida (Harvard University, USA)
"Homogeneity and Heterogeneity of Dopamine Signals"
9:25 am - 9:40 amDiscussion
9:40 am - 10:05 amElyssa Margolis (University of California, San Francisco, USA)
"Untangling Complexities of Opioid Control of VTA Neurons"
10:05 am - 10:20 amDiscussion
10:20 am - 10:50 amCoffee Break
10:50 am - 11:15 amDorit Ron (University of California, San Francisco, USA)
"Striatal Signaling and Alcohol Abuse Disorders"
11:15 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:55 amVanessa Sperandio (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA)
"Adrenergic Signaling in Bacteria"
11:55 am - 12:10 pmDiscussion
12:10 pm - 12:30 pmGeneral Discussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmStress and Affective Disorders
Discussion Leader: Elisabeth Van Bockstaele (Drexel University, USA)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pmPhilip Holmes (University of Georgia, USA)
"Involvement of the Locus Coeruleus Galanin System in Stress Resilience"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pmDiscussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pmKlaus Miczek (Tufts University, USA)
"Dopamine Activity in the VTA as a Result of Aversive Social Stress and Intensely Rewarding Cocaine"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pmDiscussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pmKay Tye (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA)
"Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons and Social Rank"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pmEric Nestler (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA)
"Transcriptional and Epigenetic Mechanisms of Depression"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Wednesday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
8:30 amGroup Photo
9:00 am - 12:30 pmCognition
Discussion Leader: Bita Moghaddam (Oregon Health & Science University, USA)
9:00 am - 9:20 amSusan Sara (Collège de France, France)
"Network Reset: The Locus Coeruleus and Cognitive Function"
9:20 am - 9:30 amDiscussion
9:30 am - 9:50 amVaishali Bakshi (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
"Sensitization of Basolateral Amygdala Noradrenergic Receptors Following Traumatic Stress Exposure: Implications for PTSD"
9:50 am - 10:00 amDiscussion
10:00 am - 10:20 amAhmad Salehi (Stanford University, USA)
"Translational Aspects of Beta-Adrenergic Signaling in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease"
10:20 am - 10:30 amDiscussion
10:30 am - 11:00 amCoffee Break
11:00 am - 11:20 amAmy Milton (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom)
"Nothing Permanent Except Change: Dopamine and Memory Reconsolidation"
11:20 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:50 amSteven Thomas (University of Pennsylvania, USA)
"Could Another Monoamine Supercede the Role of Catecholamines in Hippocampus-Dependent Memory Retrieval?"
11:50 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmShannon Gourley (Emory University School of Medicine, USA)
"Toggling Between Actions and Habits: Cortical Regulators and the Impact of Cocaine"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:00 pm - 7:30 pmBusiness Meeting
Nominations for the Next Vice Chair; Fill in Conference Evaluation Forms; Discuss Future Site and Scheduling Preferences; Election of the Next Vice Chair
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmNeurodegeneration
Discussion Leader: Carlos Paladini (University of Texas at San Antonio, USA)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pmLea Grinberg (University of California, San Francisco, USA)
"Selective Vulnerability of Aminergic Nuclei in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Tauopathies"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pmDiscussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pmMichael Heneka (University of Bonn, Germany)
"Norepinephrine Modulation of Cerebral Innate Immune Function in Alzheimer's Disease"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pmDiscussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pmJoshua Dudman (Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA)
"Dopamine and the Motivational Control of Purposive Movement"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pmMalu Tansey (Emory University, USA)
"Role of Synuclein Proteostasis in Non-Motor Features of Parkinson's Disease"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Thursday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmLearning and Motivation
Discussion Leader: Steven Thomas (University of Pennsylvania, USA)
9:00 am - 9:25 amRegina Carelli (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA)
"Neurocircuitry of Flexible Behavior"
9:25 am - 9:40 amDiscussion
9:40 am - 10:05 amKate Wassum (University of California, Los Angeles, USA)
"Modulation of Dopamine During Cue-Motivated Behavior"
10:05 am - 10:20 amDiscussion
10:20 am - 10:50 amCoffee Break
10:50 am - 11:15 amSebastian Bouret (Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Epiniere, France)
"Locus Coeruleus and Motivation in Monkeys: A Specific Role in Effort?"
11:15 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:55 amLaura Corbit (University of Sydney, Australia)
"The Role of Noradrenaline in Error-Driven Learning"
11:55 am - 12:10 pmDiscussion
12:10 pm - 12:30 pmGeneral Discussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 5:30 pmPoster Session
5:30 pm - 7:30 pmKeynote Session: Catecholaminergic Regulation of the Prefrontal Cortex and Working Memory
Discussion Leader: David Weinshenker (Emory University School of Medicine, USA)
5:30 pm - 5:45 pmLate-Breaking Topic
5:45 pm - 5:50 pmDiscussion
5:50 pm - 6:05 pmLate-Breaking Topic
6:05 pm - 6:10 pmDiscussion
6:10 pm - 6:15 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
6:15 pm - 7:15 pmAmy Arnsten (Yale University Scool of Medicine, USA)
"The Critical Actions of Catecholamines on Prefrontal Cortical Cognitive Function: Successful Translation to Human Disorders"
7:15 pm - 7:30 pmDiscussion
8:00 pmDinner
Friday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 amDeparture

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by 1R13DA043916-01 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
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