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Tissue Repair & Regeneration
Gordon Research Conference

Scientifically Informed Strategies to Turn Pathologic Tissue Repair into Perfect Regeneration

Dates

June 4-9, 2017

Location

Colby-Sawyer College
New London, NH

Organizers

Chair:
Boris Hinz

Vice Chair:
Will Wood

Meeting Description

Deregulation of normal tissue repair has dramatic consequences for life quality and survival of patients. Together, insufficient healing (chronic wounds) and excessive repair after injury (scarring/fibrosis) cause healthcare costs reaching tens of billions of dollars per year in the US alone. Chronic and fibrotic healing occur when the body's own repair capacity is either impaired or overwhelmed. One approach in regenerative medicine is to replace injured, diseased or aged tissues with functional tissue equivalents. This approach is challenged by adverse host reactions that are part of the body repair program, e.g., immune, inflammatory, and fibrotic responses. Thus, regenerative medicine increasingly considers to support the adult's body's own regenerative capacities to promote closure of wounds that never heal and to keep excessive repair at bay. However, it is still unclear why humans lost regenerative capacity during evolution, whereas lower organisms can regenerate whole organs.

The overarching aim of the 2017 edition of the GRC-TRR will be to assemble the greatest minds in regenerative biology under one roof to discuss the latest findings in the field. We have planned nine scientific sessions focusing on several topics relevant to regenerative medicine and healing of injured tissues. It is anticipated that exposure to this very diverse group of scientists will foster stimulating discussions and lead to productive collaborations, which will facilitate the development of the next generation of novel therapeutics in regenerative medicine to tackle many of the greatest health concerns and needs of the 21st century.

Related Meeting

This GRC was held in conjunction with the "Tissue Repair & Regeneration" Gordon Research Seminar (GRS). Refer to the associated GRS program page for more information.

Contributors

Meeting Program

Sunday
2:00 pm - 9:00 pmArrival and Check-in
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 7:40 pmWelcome / Introductory Comments by GRC Site Staff
7:40 pm - 9:30 pmKeynote Session: Technology Solutions to Study Repair and Regeneration
About our keynote speaker (from his web page): "John Condeelis' research interests are in optical physics, cell biology and biophysics, cancer biology and mouse models of cancer. He and his collaborators developed the multiphoton imaging technology and animal models used to identify invasion and intravasation microenvironments in mammary tumors. This led to the discovery of the paracrine interaction between tumor cells and macrophages in vivo, and the role of macrophages in the migration of tumor cells and their dissemination from primary tumors (…). John Condeelis has devised optical microscopes for uncaging, biosensor detection and multiphoton imaging and has used novel caged-enzymes and biosensors to test, in vivo, the predictions of the invasion signatures regarding the mechanisms of tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. This work has supplied markers for the prediction of breast tumor metastasis in humans."
Discussion Leader: Boris Hinz (University of Toronto, Canada)
7:40 pm - 7:45 pmOpening Remarks
7:45 pm - 8:30 pmJohn Condeelis (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA)
"Intravital Imaging of Large Tissue Volumes at Submicron Resolution to Define Microenvironments that Determine Cell Phenotype In Vivo"
8:30 pm - 8:45 pmDiscussion
8:45 pm - 9:00 pmHozana Castillo (Monash University, Australia)
"Identification of the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Zebrafish Spinal Cord Regeneration"
9:00 pm - 9:05 pmDiscussion
9:05 pm - 9:20 pmManuel Metzger (University of Cologne, Germany)
"Towards Understanding the Genetics Underlying Perfect Regeneration of Cutaneous Wounds in Adult Zebrafish"
9:20 pm - 9:25 pmDiscussion
9:25 pm - 9:30 pmGeneral Discussion
Monday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmThe Role of Inflammatory Cells in Driving Repair and Regeneration
Inflammatory cells have long been considered crucial to trigger the healing cascade of tissue repair after injury. However the role of inflammation in controlling (sterile) repair processes is far more complex given the large heterogeneity of different innate and adaptive immune cells and their subtypes. Depending on the timing of inflammatory cell appearance, their activation state, the microenvironment, the cellular interaction partners and the duration of their persistence, inflammation can be either beneficial or detrimental for healing. This session will help to understand and consider the multiple roles of inflammatory cells to develop new and successful tissue repair strategies.
Discussion Leader: Paul Martin (University of Bristol, United Kingdom)
9:00 am - 9:15 amIntroduction by Discussion Leader
9:15 am - 9:40 amMaria Leptin (EMBO / University of Cologne, Germany)
"Inflammation and Wound Repair in Fish and Flies"
9:40 am - 9:50 amDiscussion
9:50 am - 10:10 amPhilipp Niethammer (Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, USA)
"The Early Wound Signals: Illuminating the Wound Microenvironment in Live Zebrafish"
10:10 am - 10:20 amDiscussion
10:20 am - 10:45 amCoffee Break
10:45 am - 11:05 amThomas Wynn (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, USA)
"Type 2 Inflammation in Repair, Regeneration and Fibrosis"
11:05 am - 11:15 amDiscussion
11:15 am - 11:30 amSandra Franz (Leipzig University, Germany)
"Dermal Fibroblasts as Regulators of Inflammation and Macrophage Activation During Dermal Wound Healing"
11:30 am - 11:35 amDiscussion
11:35 am - 11:50 amDenise Gay (UMR 967, CEA/INSERM, France)
"M2 Macrophages Play Pivotal Roles in Determining Skin Wound Fate: Regeneration or Fibrotic Repair"
11:50 am - 11:55 amDiscussion
11:55 am - 12:10 pmRyoichi Mori (Nagasaki University, Japan)
"Comprehensive Identification of Wound Healing and Inflammation miRNAs Reveals a Key Role for miR-223 in Neutrophilic Clearance of S. Aureus at Wound Sites"
12:10 pm - 12:15 pmDiscussion
12:15 pm - 12:25 pmRonald Vagnozzi (Cincinnati Children's Hospital, USA)
"The Acute Immune Response Underlies the Therapeutic Efficacy of Cardiac Cell Therapy in the Mouse"
12:25 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmOrgan-Specific Regeneration and Repair Processes
Although the fundamental repair processes are remarkably similar across different organs, every tissue has a specific subset of tissue repair and regeneration precursor cells that may also differ between species. It is one of the great challenges of regenerative medicine and pharmaceutical companies to devise strategies that are effective in various organ systems. This session will add to our understanding of common and distinct actions of different factors among different organs and species.
Discussion Leader: Jeremy Duffield (University of Washington / Vertex Pharmaceuticals, USA)
7:30 pm - 7:45 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
7:45 pm - 8:05 pmFiona Doetsch (Biozentrum, University of Basel, Switzerland)
"Stem Cells and Their Niche in the Adult Brain"
8:05 pm - 8:15 pmDiscussion
8:15 pm - 8:35 pmKit Parker (Harvard University, USA)
"Regenerating the Heart with Induced Stem Cells"
8:35 pm - 8:45 pmDiscussion
8:45 pm - 8:55 pmWilliam Chen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA)
"Regenerating Infarcted Adult Mammalian Myocardium with Decellularized Zebrafish Cardiac Extracellular Matrix"
8:55 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pmRebecca Wells (University of Pennsylvania, USA)
"The Mechanics of Liver Repair"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Tuesday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmThe Mechanics of Repair and Regeneration
Mechanical factors play crucial roles in regulating repair and regeneration of organs. In fact, the mechanical environment is one of the main orchestrators of the complex processes of tissue repair and regeneration. It is thus fundamental to consult bioengineers and biophysicists to understand healing who will enrich this session.
Discussion Leader: Christopher Chen (Boston University / Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, USA)
9:00 am - 9:15 amIntroduction by Discussion Leader
9:15 am - 9:40 amMartin Schwartz (Yale School of Medicine, USA)
"Matrix, Mechanics and Integrin Mediated Signaling"
9:40 am - 9:50 amDiscussion
9:50 am - 10:10 amViola Vogel (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)
"Mechanobiology of Extracellular Matrix: From Cells to Tissues"
10:10 am - 10:20 amDiscussion
10:20 am - 11:00 amGroup Photo / Coffee Break
11:00 am - 11:20 amThomas Barker (University of Virginia, USA)
"Mechanical Guidance of Fibroblast Activation"
11:20 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:40 amAlison McGuigan (University of Toronto, Canada)
"Engineered Cancer-Stromal Interfaces to Explore the Impact of Cancer Associated Fibroblasts on Tumor Cell Phenotype"
11:40 am - 11:45 amDiscussion
11:45 am - 11:55 amNuno Coelho (University of Toronto, Canada)
"Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Activation Regulates Beta1-Integrin Dependent MAPK Signaling"
11:55 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmRodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez (University of Toronto, Canada)
"Dynamic Force Patterns Promote Collective Cell Migration During Embryonic Wound Repair"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmCancer, Skin, and the Wound Healing Analogy
This session will visit a topic that has been a mainstay of GRC-TRR for many years, namely the mechanisms governing skin repair and wound healing in normal and cancer settings. Was Dvorak right in describing tumours as wounds that do not heal?
Discussion Leader: Sabine Werner (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)
7:30 pm - 7:45 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
7:45 pm - 8:05 pmErik Sahai (The Francis Crick Institute, United Kingdom)
"The Tumor-Stroma Connection"
8:05 pm - 8:15 pmDiscussion
8:15 pm - 8:35 pmEdna Cukierman (Fox Chase Cancer Center, USA)
"Desmoplasia - The Mesenchymal Chronic Fibrosis Aspect of Epithelial Cancers"
8:35 pm - 8:45 pmDiscussion
8:45 pm - 8:55 pmTanya Shaw (King's College London, United Kingdom)
"Unique Proteins in Keloid Scar Extracellular Matrix Highlight a Cartilage-Like Composition Suggesting Mis-Differentiation of Fibroblasts in Disease"
8:55 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:10 pmAndrew Leask (University of Western Ontario, Canada)
"The Role of Fibroblast-Derived CCN1 in Dermal Homeostasis, Fibrosis and Melanoma Metastasis"
9:10 pm - 9:15 pmDiscussion
9:15 pm - 9:25 pmMartine Dunnwald (The University of Iowa, USA)
"Arhgap29 and Irf6 in Cutaneous Tissue Repair"
9:25 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Wednesday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmTargeting Signaling Pathways in Repair and Regeneration
Signalling pathways that are central in development are often (re-) activated in conditions of tissue repair and regeneration. However, in the different environment of injured adult tissue the same signalling molecules will generate very different cell responses. This session will discuss whether scientifically informed therapeutic intervention can emphasize positive and inhibit negative effects of exacerbated signalling events.
Discussion Leader: Enrique Amaya (University of Manchester, United Kingdom)
9:00 am - 9:15 amIntroduction by Discussion Leader
9:15 am - 9:40 amDennis Discher (University of Pennsylvania, USA)
"Squeezing the Nucleus"
9:40 am - 9:50 amDiscussion
9:50 am - 10:10 amMichael Galko (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA)
"Signaling Pathways that Regulate Tissue Damage-Induced Pain Sensitization"
10:10 am - 10:20 amDiscussion
10:20 am - 10:45 amCoffee Break
10:45 am - 11:05 amLorin Olson (Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, USA)
"PDGF Receptor Alpha or Beta: Does It Matter"
11:05 am - 11:15 amDiscussion
11:15 am - 11:25 amJessica Lehoczky (Brigham and Women's Hospital / Harvard Medical School, USA)
"Lgr6 Marks Nail Stem Cells and Is Required for Digit Tip Regeneration"
11:25 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:40 amDavid O'Gorman (Lawson Health Research Institute, Canada)
"Analyses of Dysregulated WT1 Expression, Transactivation by β-Catenin and Alternative Transcript Splicing Reveal Molecular Parallels Between Palmar Fascia Fibrosis and Cancer"
11:40 am - 11:45 amDiscussion
11:45 am - 11:55 amFoteini Mourkioti (University of Pennsylvania, USA)
"Stem Cell Regulation During Regeneration in Muscular Dystrophy"
11:55 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmSabine Eming (University of Cologne, Germany)
"Role of TOR Pathway Components in Skin Homeostasis"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmEpigenetics - Memory in Tissue Repair and Regeneration
Mechanisms that control wound healing and phenotype of cells are orchestrated by the combined influences of molecular components of epigenome including DNA methylation, vast array of posttranslational modifications of the histone protein constituents of chromatin and regulatory noncoding RNAs of which microRNAs are the most extensively studied. Epigenetic modifications are believed to be a major factor responsible for the persistence of deregulated repair in disease and will be discussed as potential targets for therapies.
Discussion Leader: Irene De Lazaro Del Rey (University of Manchester, United Kingdom)
7:30 pm - 7:45 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
7:45 pm - 8:05 pmDerek Mann (Newcastle University, United Kingdom)
"Epigentic Regulators of Fibrosis"
8:05 pm - 8:15 pmDiscussion
8:15 pm - 8:35 pmElisabeth Zeisberg (University of Goettingen, Germany)
"Epigenetic Programming of Stem Cells"
8:35 pm - 8:45 pmDiscussion
8:45 pm - 8:55 pmKimberly Mace (University of Manchester, United Kingdom)
"Epigenetic Regulation of Myeloid Cells During Wound Healing"
8:55 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pmMichael Levin (Tufts University, USA)
"Endogenous Bioelectric Circuits: Rewriting Somatic Pattern Memories for Control of Regenerative Anatomy"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Thursday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
8:30 am - 9:00 amBusiness Meeting
Nominations for the Next Vice Chair; Fill in Conference Evaluation Forms; Discuss Future Site and Scheduling Preferences; Election of the Next Vice Chair
9:00 am - 12:30 pmStem Cells: Still the Holy Grail for Perfect Healing?
There is much interest and excitement about the potential use of stem cells for the treatment of a vast variety of human diseases or injuries. There is also a great need to understand how stem cells and progenitor cells are maintained and how they might be activated or corrupted following injury and disease. The session will discuss the dogma that stem cells are always a good therapy choice, with the ultimate aim to understand how to improve stem cell therapies.
Discussion Leader: Claudia Fischbach (Cornell University, USA)
9:00 am - 9:15 amIntroduction by Discussion Leader
9:15 am - 9:40 amFabio Rossi (University of British Columbia, Canada)
"Muscle Progenitor Lineages"
9:40 am - 9:50 amDiscussion
9:50 am - 10:10 amSara Wickstrom (Max Planck Institute for Biology of Aging, Germany)
"Stem Cell-Niche Interactions in Cell Fate Regulation"
10:10 am - 10:20 amDiscussion
10:20 am - 10:45 amCoffee Break
10:45 am - 11:05 amYuval Rinkevich (CPC Research School / Institute of Lung Biology and Disease (iLBD), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany)
"Dermal Fibroblast Lineages in Cancer and Wound Repair"
11:05 am - 11:15 amDiscussion
11:15 am - 11:25 amVashe Chandrakanthan (University of New South Wales, Australia)
"Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Like Cell Mediated Long-Term Transplantable Hematopoietic Stem Cells Generation from Non-Hemogenic Endothelial Cells"
11:25 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:50 amValerie Horsley (Yale University, USA)
"The Good Sides of Fat Tissue: Promoting Wound Healing"
11:50 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmPaola Romagnani (University of Florence, Italy)
"Kidney Progenitors"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmExperimental Models and Organisms to Study Repair
The final session of the meeting will cover emerging topics in the area of model organisms and novel approaches to study repair and regeneration. What can we learn from organisms that are fortunate enough to be able to regenerate whole organs?
Discussion Leader: Will Wood (University of Bristol, United Kingdom)
7:30 pm - 7:45 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
7:45 pm - 8:05 pmJames Coffman (MDI Biological Laboratory, USA)
"Glucocorticoid-Induced Developmental Programming of the Adult Immune System Response to Injury in Zebrafish"
8:05 pm - 8:15 pmDiscussion
8:15 pm - 8:35 pmBrigitte Galliot (University of Geneva, Switzerland)
"Regeneration and Resistance to Aging, Two Faces of the Same Coin in Hydra?"
8:35 pm - 8:45 pmDiscussion
8:45 pm - 8:55 pmRosario Sanchez-Gonzalez (Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany)
"Tissue Scarring - The Dark Side of Immune Response"
8:55 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:15 pmYaron Fuchs (Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel)
"Caspase-3 Regulates YAP-Dependent Organ Size and Skin Regeneration"
9:15 pm - 9:20 pmDiscussion
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmGeneral Discussion
Friday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 amDeparture

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by (1 R13AR71767-01) from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) and all cofunding support provided by the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
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