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Environmental Nanotechnology
Gordon Research Conference

The Next Generation of Nanotechnology: Materials, Applications, and Implications

Dates

June 18-23, 2017

Location

Stoweflake Conference Center
Stowe, VT Site Information

Organizers

Chair:
Sharon L. Walker

Vice Chair:
Rebecca Klaper

Application Deadline

Applications for this meeting must be submitted by May 21, 2017. Please apply early, as some meetings become oversubscribed (full) before this deadline. If the meeting is oversubscribed, it will be stated here. Note: Applications for oversubscribed meetings will only be considered by the Conference Chair if more seats become available due to cancellations.

Meeting Description

Increasing numbers of commercial, industrial and environmental products and processes are using nano-enabled systems. This 4th GRC on environmental nanotechnology will focus on nano-enabled products, including better understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials from these products and the environment through metrology and basic understanding of interactions with biological entities. In addition we will discuss public perception of nanomaterials and how we as scientists can better frame the public discussion surrounding nanomaterials. In the past decade, the scientific community has made great advances in research evaluating nanomaterials that may eventually be used in consumer products and their eventual distribution in to the environment. This meeting will discuss the next steps in the field and projecting into the future. The meeting will focus on topics such as advances in nanomaterial design and development for creating the next generation of materials, as well as the new applications that are being developed for these materials. These applications range from fabrication and unique properties of highly novel nanostructured materials that are, as yet, underutilized in such applications (e.g., 2D nanostructures, soft nanomaterials, and bio-nanocomposites to innovative applications of both established and emerging nanomaterials to address grand environmental challenges related to resource security and sustainable development (e.g., carbon capture and conversion, nano-enabled membranes at the energy-water nexus, and sensing technologies for real-time environmental quality monitoring). The applications of materials for food and agriculture will also be discussed and their negative but also positive implications for the environment. In addition the development and application for characterization of in situ characterization techniques to reliably measure the extrinsic properties, or those that depend on the surrounding environment will be explored.

Related Meeting

This GRC will be held in conjunction with the "Environmental Nanotechnology" Gordon Research Seminar (GRS). Those interested in attending both meetings must submit an application for the GRS in addition to an application for the GRC. Refer to the associated GRS program page for more information.

Contributors

Meeting Program

Sunday
2:00 pm - 9:00 pmArrival and Check-in
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 7:40 pmWelcome / Introductory Comments by GRC Site Staff
7:40 pm - 9:30 pmEngaging the Public
While research advances over the past couple of decades have led to the incorporation of nanomaterials into consumer products across a wide variety of application areas, the public remains largely unaware of nanotechnology. In order for the general public to make informed decisions, nanotechnology needs to be part of basic science literacy. Although in select cases nanotechnology has made it into formal science standards, most efforts have focused on informal science education. In the U.S., the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network had a considerable reach of over 35 million people through a network of science museums and universities. There are also efforts to further broaden the reach and meet people where they are, whether in short segments on the nightly news, or with nano-themed panels at comic book conventions. This session will showcase examples of engaging and educating the public through videos, games, contests, and other means.
Discussion Leader: Rebecca Klaper (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA)
7:40 pm - 7:50 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
7:50 pm - 8:30 pmLisa Friedersdorf (National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, USA)
"Nanotechnology: Strategies to Inform and Inspire"
8:30 pm - 8:40 pmDiscussion
8:40 pm - 9:20 pmDaniel Herr (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, USA)
"Catalyzing STEAM Experiences in the 21st Century"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Monday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
8:30 amGroup Photo
9:00 am - 12:30 pmNanoanalytics
Characterization of engineered nanomaterials remains an over-arching priority for their innovative and responsible use in consumer products. However, in situ characterization techniques to reliably measure the extrinsic properties, or those that depend on the surrounding environment, remain in their infancy. A similar knowledge gap is just starting to close for the integration of nanomaterials or in-situ synthesis of nanostructures in products via system-depending interactions. A better understanding of these extrinsic properties are critical to developing testing strategies for environmental fate, consumer product release, and lifecycle analysis. This session will focus on the development and application of nano-analytical techniques for extrinsic characterization of engineered nanomaterials. Attendees will learn about cutting-edge characterization methods, how they were developed and validated, and how they can be applied to real-world problems.
Discussion Leader: Dave Holbrook (National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA)
9:00 am - 9:10 amIntroduction by Discussion Leader
9:10 am - 9:50 amJohn Pettibone (National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA)
"Reexamining Structural and Chemical Changes During Nanoparticle Transformations"
9:50 am - 10:10 amDiscussion
10:10 am - 10:30 amCoffee Break
10:30 am - 11:10 amLinsey Marr (Virginia Tech, USA)
"Characterization of Engineered Nanomaterials in the Atmosphere"
11:10 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 12:10 pmRobert Hurt (Brown University, USA)
"Back to Nature - Environmental Transformations of Nanomaterials and Their Implications for Risk"
12:10 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
3:00 pm - 4:00 pmPower Hour
The GRC Power Hour is an optional informal gathering open to all meeting participants. It is designed to help address the challenges women face in science and support the professional growth of women in our communities by providing an open forum for discussion and mentoring.
Organizer: Christy Haynes (University of Minnesota, USA)
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmNano-Biophenomena and Processes
Naturally occurring and incidental nanoparticles dominate the potential exposure to nanomaterials by many orders of magnitude. Many of these materials are similar or sometime indistinguishable from engineered nanoparticles. This session explores the nature and occurrence of natural and incidental nanoparticles, their roles in ecosystems and their potential impacts on human health.
Discussion Leader: Mark Wiesner (Duke University, USA)
7:30 pm - 7:40 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
7:40 pm - 8:20 pmNadine Kabengi (Georgia State University, USA)
"Using Microcalorimetry and Reactions Energetics to Probe the Surface of Metal Oxides Nanomaterials"
8:20 pm - 8:35 pmDiscussion
8:35 pm - 9:15 pmMichael Schindler (Laurentian University, Canada)
"Mineral Surface Coatings: Records of Environmental Processes at the Nano-Scale and Sinks of Metal(loid)-Bearing Nanoparticles"
9:15 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Tuesday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmNew Materials: Emerging Nanomaterials and Smart Design
The broad spectrum of nanotechnologies now includes suites of novel tools and materials with which engineers and scientists can technically address global grand challenges, including, but not limited to, sustainable energy and environmental quality. In this session, speakers will explore recent advances in nanomaterial design and development, focusing on the fabrication and unique properties of highly novel nanostructured materials that are, as yet, underutilized in such applications (e.g., 2D nanostructures, soft nanomaterials, and bio-nanocomposites).
Discussion Leader: John Fortner (Washington University in St. Louis, USA)
9:00 am - 9:10 amIntroduction by Discussion Leader
9:10 am - 9:50 amChristy Landes (Rice University, USA)
"Imaging the Dynamic Protein-Nanoparticle Interface: What We've Learned and Where We're Going"
9:50 am - 10:10 amDiscussion
10:10 am - 10:30 amCoffee Break
10:30 am - 11:10 amPhillip Christopher (University of California, Riverside, USA)
"Atomic Scale Insights into Physical Transformations of Heterogeneous Catalysts Under Reactive Environments"
11:10 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 12:10 pmVolodymyr Tarabara (Michigan State University, USA)
"Reactive Membranes for Water Treatment and Reuse: Materials and Process Design"
12:10 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmNew Directions: Innovative Applications
In this session, speakers will highlight innovative applications of both established and emerging nanomaterials to address grand environmental challenges related to resource security and sustainable development (e.g., carbon capture and conversion, nano-enabled membranes at the energy-water nexus, and sensing technologies for real-time environmental quality monitoring).
Discussion Leader: Korin Wheeler (Santa Clara University, USA)
7:30 pm - 7:40 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
7:40 pm - 8:20 pmPrashant Kamat (University of Notre Dame, USA)
"Making Sense of Smart Sensors. A Nanotechnology Perspective for Environmental Remediation"
8:20 pm - 8:35 pmDiscussion
8:35 pm - 9:15 pmVincent Rotello (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA)
"Interfacing Nanoparticles with the Biological/Biomedical World"
9:15 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Wednesday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmNanomanufacturing: Nano-Enabled Products: Why, Why Not, and How?
To Nano or Not to Nano: That is the Question. The dream of nanotechnology was and is to provide materials with novel, previously unattainable properties with some net societal and economic benefit. Nano-enabled products are emerging in many commercial sectors, yet little is known about how their performance, cost, and environmental benefits/costs compare to existing market solutions. In this session, we compare the benefits and impacts for nano-enabled versus traditional materials through integrative, life-cycle approaches and address design rules to enhance benefit.
Discussion Leader: Desiree Plata (Yale University, USA)
9:00 am - 9:10 amIntroduction by Discussion Leader
9:10 am - 9:50 amElaine Cohen Hubal (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, USA)
"Evaluating Impacts of Nano-Enabled Materials: Context for Understanding and Risk-Based Decisions"
9:50 am - 10:10 amDiscussion
10:10 am - 10:30 amCoffee Break
10:30 am - 11:10 amSara Brenner (SUNY Polytechnic Institute, USA)
"Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety: Enabling Nanotechnology Commercialization and Advanced Manufacturing"
11:10 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 12:10 pmMatthew Eckelman (Northeastern University, USA)
"Estimating Energy, Environmental, and Health Costs and Benefits of Nanotechnology"
12:10 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:00 pm - 7:30 pmBusiness Meeting
Nominations for the Next Vice Chair; Fill in Conference Evaluation Forms; Discuss Future Site and Scheduling Preferences; Election of the Next Vice Chair
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmNanomanufacturing: Translational Issues and Design Opportunities in Manufacturing
Realizing the promise of nanotechnology requires scalable, sustainable processes, and the pathway to those scaled production practices can be illuminated by a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that give rise to the nano-enabled performance and nano-derived environmental hazards. In this session, we seek to define some of the critical challenges facing nano manufacturing scalability and translation to market, some of the chief environmental concerns that may exist, and emergent design rules to help simultaneously surmount those issues and enable the translation of nano materials to market.
Discussion Leader: Reginald Rogers (Rochester Institute of Technology, USA)
7:30 pm - 7:40 pmIntroduction by Discussion Leader
7:40 pm - 8:20 pmKhershed Cooper (National Science Foundation, USA)
"NSF Nanomanufacturing Research"
8:20 pm - 8:35 pmDiscussion
8:35 pm - 9:15 pmNicole Steinmetz (Case Western Reserve University, USA)
"Plant Virus-Based Nanotechnologies: Applications in Medicine, Materials, and Environment"
9:15 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Thursday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmFood and Agricultural Applications of Nano
This session will focus on recent developments for nanotechnology as it pertains to application in a broad range of food products as well as in agricultural applications of technology. This session will highlight upcoming preparations in food production and food materials.
Discussion Leader: Katrina Varner (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, USA)
9:00 am - 9:40 amRamesh Raliya (Washington University in St. Louis, USA)
"Nanotechnology for Sustainable Agriculture and Environmental Consequences"
9:40 am - 10:00 amDiscussion
10:00 am - 10:30 amCoffee Break
10:30 am - 11:10 amJason White (Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, USA)
"Nanomaterials and the Food Supply: Assessing the Balance Between Applications and Implications"
11:10 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 12:10 pmTimothy Duncan (U.S. Food and Drug Administration, USA)
"Using Model Systems to Experimentally Assess Possible Exposure to Nanoparticles and Associated Additives from Polymer Nanocomposite Food Contact Materials"
12:10 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmFrom "Nano to Global" – Geochemistry and Nanotechnology
This session will focus on how nano-scale innovations have the potential to facilitate large-scale impacts for the environment, either directly or indirectly. For example, the use of nano to replace existing formulations of pesticides or how the implementation of nano in a wide range of products can have a cumulatively beneficial effect over traditional materials (e.g. by minimizing climate change, metal cycling and pollution generation). A focus on life-cycle approaches and life-cycle assessment aim to address the benefit that nano materials can holistically bring and how they can influence positive changes at a global scale.
Discussion Leader: Denise Mitrano (Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG), Switzerland)
7:30 pm - 8:10 pmRoland Hischier (EMPA - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Switzerland)
"Ecological Consequences from the Use of Engineered Nanomaterials in Consumer Good – A Holistic View with the Support of the Life Cycle Assessment Framework"
8:10 pm - 8:30 pmDiscussion
8:30 pm - 9:10 pmMelanie Kah (University of Vienna, Austria)
"Nano-Enabled Agrochemicals: Emerging Contaminants or Solutions for Risk Mitigation"
9:10 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
Friday
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 amDeparture
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